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Author Topic: To Samsung or not to Samsung?  (Read 4764 times)

pjnoxon

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To Samsung or not to Samsung?
« on: January 08, 2013, 12:50:31 »
Hi, I am new to Linux but have computer background so not scared off by
complexity. Looking into Ubuntu 12.04 for use in teaching music overseas.
Recently bought Samsung ML-2995ND printer and found thread on Ubuntu
forums that leads to this very nice resource.

Unpacked the printer ($79 at Frys in Irving Texas) and found that it says
110 - 127V on the unit, although it says 220V on the outside of the box
and the salesman (appeared to be from India) assured me that he has
one and it works on 220V. Turns out that printers are one of the few items
that are not world voltage compatible currently. So I am thinking I need to
return this printer and buy one from an overseas dealer so that it will run
on 220V. So I have this opportunity to rethink my Samsung decision.

I checked into getting a transformer, and for a printer this is at least $30
and is at least 10 lbs. I would be able to wire up a 220V outlet here in
order to try the printer, and would probably leave the printer overseas
if/when I return to USA, so really no reason to have this a 110V printer.

I chose based upon price and that the Samsung website listed Linux
driver capability, but it seems that there are problems with Samsung
drivers (I admit I have not studied this and Ubuntu forums very much).

At this time, would I be better off choosing another printer brand, or
given this resource would I find all other brands have even more problems
and at least here I can get better quality support than what is available
with that for HP, brother, Oki, etc?

Primarily need to print music from MuseScore.

thanks - PJ

bchemnet

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Re: To Samsung or not to Samsung?
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2013, 16:11:06 »
In my experience, HP printers are by far the best supported under Linux, and I have never encountered one (admittedly not a huge sample size) that did not install easily and with a full feature set (often more features than under Windows) using packages available with any current Linux distribution.

Most Samsung printers and setups also seem to work well, especially using this repository - something close to 10,000 people (from all over the world) seem to be using it now, and relatively few do anything other than install a basic of set of packages and go.  So while problems certainly exist, most people don't encounter anything other than the need to set up this repository to access the drivers.

Based on my research when I was recently in the market for a new printer, Brother, Oki, etc. are all comparable to Samsung in Linux support - usually it works, but not necessarily using standard drivers available in the distribution and there are some difficult cases.  However, I'm not aware of an equivalent support group/external repository to deal with any other manufacturer (which isn't to say they don't exist - I haven't looked very hard).  A few companies are still truly awful with Linux support, and it is much harder to determine in advance if a printer will work.

So all things being equal, I would probably recommend HP.  However, not all things are equal.  So if a Samsung printer that meets your requirements is cheaper, or higher quality at a particular price, or simply gets much better reviews than a comparable HP, I would certainly not discourage you from purchasing the Samsung.

pjnoxon

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Re: To Samsung or not to Samsung?
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2013, 01:47:08 »
OK, thanks for your comments. I wonder about the toner cost too?
Turns out I already bought a toner cartridge for the Samsung for
$30, and this seems to be cheaper than the HP toner. I suspect
that HP toner cartridges are probably more available however.

- pj

bchemnet

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Re: To Samsung or not to Samsung?
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2013, 22:16:32 »
Local availability is pretty variable, but I have not had any issues with internet orders of any toner.  And I don't know that my use is typical, but my Samsung cartridges certainly last a long time and don't degrade noticeably even after 3-4 years of use.

I also have to comment that as annoying as my Samsung printer is at times, it really does significantly out-perform the "comparable" HP printers that I also regularly use, at least in terms of print quality (the HP printers are quieter and substantially faster).  So it is definitely worth looking carefully at specifications and reviews before making a final decision.  (My printer hasn't been sold for years, so that's not directly appicable for you.)

phillipsjk

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Re: To Samsung or not to Samsung?
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2014, 16:31:52 »
I have had a Bad experience trying to purchase a $200 HP MFP (and Lexmark network laser Printer). Apparently, you need to move to the $400-$600 price-point to avoid "dumb" printers. Note: the Lexmark was essentially a $400 printer that prohibited using re-manufactured cartridges.

It boggles the mind that the interface for such stupid printers would even be secret.

Edit: To be fair, the Samsung binary driver also prohibits installation on more than one computer. My concern was that the Binary driver is required for some models. About all you can do is look for PCL5 or PostScript support (which implies a more powerful/expensive printer).
Quote from: Samsung ULD_V1.00.27.04.tar.gz /uld/noarch/license/eula.txt
...
1.   GRANT OF LICENSE.
The SOFTWARE PRODUCT is licensed, not sold. Subject to the condition that you are in compliance with the terms of this EULA, SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS grants you the following licenses: (a) you may install and use one copy of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT, or any prior version for the same operating system, on a single computer for use by a single simultaneous operator; and (b) you may install a single copy of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT, strictly for your own personal use, on one portable computer owned by you. No other use, copying or distribution of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT is permitted. Your use of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT shall be subject to restrictions and limitations as specified in this EULA. ..,
2.    RESTRICTIONS AND LIMITATIONS ON USE OF THE SOFTWARE PRODUCT
PROHIBITION OF ALTERATION
Except to the extent such a restriction is unenforceable under local law, you may not reverse engineer, decompile, or disassemble the SOFTWARE PRODUCT. The SOFTWARE PRODUCT is licensed as a single product, and its component parts may not be separated for use on more than one computer. Except to the extent such a restriction is unenforceable under local law, you may not modify, amend, or create derivative works of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT.  ...
(Bold mine.)

Essentially, you are only allowed to use common network printers with one computer (2 if you have a laptop as well). The prohibition on reverse engineering makes it difficult to document the printer interface for writing restriction-free drivers.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2014, 00:08:07 by phillipsjk »

 

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